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Bungalow Jazz

NOTE: Bungalow Jazz held its last show on June 3rd, 2017 and is now closed. Read our review of the final show here. FJO Webmaster Palmer Moore has created a page for Bungalow memories – click here to revisit some of Becky’s shows and share your own memories.

Bungalow Jazz

Bungalow Jazz
Becky Ogden’s House

2539 East Fifth Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43219
614-397-5540
Website: http://bungalowjazz.com
How to get there: MAP

BUNGALOW JAZZ is an occasional series of combo jazz performances in the intimacy and warmth of Becky’s unique East Columbus home. Becky’s big old 1910 bungalow sits on an acre ravine lot on East Fifth Avenue, deeply connected to Columbus’s jazz community, Becky has long opened her house for friendly musical gatherings. Since closing her Columbus Music Hall, she still sees the need for places where musicians and their audiences can mingle. Hence, Bungalow Jazz, the casual “house concert” jazz party.

The fabulous seven-foot Mason Hamlin piano sits in the living room, waiting for artists like Dave DeWitt and Joe Hunter to bring out its warm and beautiful sound. After a post-jazz festival session, Wess “Warmdaddy” Anderson said, “I LOVE this room!”

The combined first-floor space seats about fifty people with overflow in the dining room (home to the English pub bar familiar to denizens of the Firehouse). Every event is BYOB, with free snacks, desserts, soft drinks and coffee furnished by your hostess. BYO goodies too, if you want to contribute to the munchies. And by all means, bring your own children: The atmosphere is family-style and welcoming.

About House Concerts Like Bungalow Jazz

House concerts hold a place of esteem in jazz history and are making a comeback today. In 1920s Harlem they were “rent parties,” where the likes of Fats Waller played in the apartments of people hosting music and dance parties literally to raise money for the rent.

In the 1970s, musicians pushing the frontiers of jazz weren’t making it on the shrinking club scene. Musicians like Anthony Braxton and Oliver Lake found private loft concerts a more viable way to present their music.

House concerts have become popular across the country once again, so much so that Down Beat magazine, Minnesota Public Radio, and The New York Times have reported on the trend in cities from New York and Washington to Atlanta, Minneapolis, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

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